2. Kike & the Flash Drive

Source: http://architecturenigeria.com/

Phillips Building Source: http://architecturenigeria.com/

“Abere ona ki i sina”

 He who asks for directions never gets lost.

In the middle of the contest for UNAAB’s Student Union President in the year, I resumed for my internship at PPC Limited in Ojota, Lagos. That was an election I lost and it’s a story for another day.

The experience at PPC building located behind the giant Phillips building in Ojota is an interesting but let me tell you about my first day at work. I found out that I was the only intern not from the University of Lagos. Wow! Interesting! Minutes after being shown round the glassy dividers, I was asked to take a file from the computer and proceed to the Engineering site, one of the posh houses in Shell Quarters Osborne Road, where we were fixing PABX installation.

Mr Chuma handed me a flash drive to copy an item from the laptop.

‘This is scary”!

“I have never handled a flash drive before.”

The only access I had to a computer was to buy internet login tickets, check few emails and watch the clock race to zero. I guess we all remember how we watched the cybercafe clock speed so fast. I have been attending the cybercafe ritual since 2002 and in four years, I did not do more than “launch the Internet Explorer”, a 400-level student of Engineering, this was a trial period.

Now to the dreaded flash drive, I looked all around the computer, checking the monitor if it was the right place. It wasn’t. The manager stared from afar, impatient. He wanted the file at once.

“ I felt I might be sent packing since this was clearly a testament that I couldn’t use a computer”, I spoke within me.

I saw a young slim lady- Kike, who was also rushing out of the office. She told me the memory stick is not fixed into the monitor and mostly the port is at the back of the CPU. I had been fiddling with the monitor looking for where to place the memory stick. She put in the stick for me. Wow. I was glad but the next puzzle was how to locate the file.

I was just roaming the mouse over the desktop, clueless. She helped me but she asked a question, “Do you have a computer, you obviously don’t”. I bought myself a flash drive. I hung it on my neck, watched it happily swing while I walked back home.

Interestingly, I learnt. A major reason I decided to be more interested in tech. This experience meant a lot to me because I had to learn fast. I was not catching up with the times. I felt like there were ten planets between other UNILAG students and I. I gave my all to write computer network exams, got my CCNA (another story) before I left University.

The seeds were sown. That’s how the tech in me started. Sometimes, I carry that regret, that I went the networking route rather than take on programming. However, things don’t happen to us, they happen for us.

Of not knowing but asking from Kike, my best friend during that internship. It was of being humbled but asking, because of such lowly depths, does an eruption rise.

This post is the part of the 30-day series on the “irinkinrido” adventure of Mr. Oluseun Onigbinde who clocks 30 this month. 

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3 thoughts on “2. Kike & the Flash Drive

  1. Reblogged this on lovenpain12 and commented:
    beautiful blog, a reminder of our parlous educational system. we had no practical experience only theoretical, our theory were our worst nightmare.
    “Eyin omo unaabu, eje lo relaxi, ke ma ba kolapsi” UNAAB student please relax lest u collapse

  2. “ I felt I might be sent packing since this is clearly a testament I can’t use a computer.” I spoke within me.
    I was just roaming the mouse over the desktop, clueless. She helped me but she asked a question “Do you have a computer, you obviously don’t”. I bought myself a flash drive. I hung it on my neck, watch it happily swing while I walked back home.

    these paragraphs got me laughing and colleagues are wondering what da hell is wrong with me. i had to share with them. this your adventure na wao…

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